Now Reading: Climate FieldView™ Disease Image Contest: How You Can Help Students in Your Community

Climate FieldView™ Disease Image Contest: How You Can Help Students in Your Community

by Steven Ward, Director of Geospatial Sciences, The Climate Corporation

May 8, 2017

Growing up in sugarcane and rice country in Southern Louisiana, I understand the importance of helping farmers identify, predict and diagnose crop disease and stress. That’s why The Climate Corporation’s Geospatial Sciences team is inviting you to engage with local FFA and PAS Chapters to participate in our first-ever corn disease and stress image contest to develop what we anticipate will become the largest disease image database in existence. This database will help train the artificial intelligence systems we are building to diagnose and predict corn diseases in your fields. Ultimately, the goal is to help you save time and protect yield.

cfv-planting

I know it is a busy time for you, I hope you can find time to help your local chapters participate in the contest for their chance to win a prize of up to $500. Here’s how you can help:

  • Engage with local FFA and PAS chapters allowing them to scout your fields to spot diseases and stress in your corn fields
  • Allow local FFA and PAS chapters members to take some photos (according to the contest rules and guidelines)
  • Help them gather as many high-quality corn disease and stress images as possible

While this contest may help build the largest disease image database in existence, it will also give FFA and PAS members the opportunity to:

  • Learn more about careers in digital agriculture, including science technology engineering and math (STEM)
  • Work with local dealers and farmers to extend their educational experience
  • Get students involved with Climate FieldView™ technology to showcase high tech jobs in the agriculture industry
  • Create awareness of Climate FieldView technology and digital agriculture within their community

For full details of the contest, please visit climate.com/diseaseproject.

Happy planting!
Steven